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1939

The Associated Jewish Charities opened a beautiful, new headquarters at 319 W. Monument Street. Built through the generosity of Aaron and Lillie Straus, the building also housed the Hebrew Free Burial Society and the Hebrew Free Loan Association. 

1939

With the rise of antisemitism nationwide, the Baltimore Jewish Council was created to safeguard “the equal rights of Jews.” Rabbi Morris Lieberman of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation was its first part-time unpaid director. The organization would expand its mandate in the 1990s “to include outreach to other […]

1939

Associated Placement and Guidance Services (APGS) was established to provide the technical training, career counseling and job placement to Jewish people in the Baltimore community. APGS mostly served recent immigrants and the physically and mentally handicapped.

1937

As Jewish families fled Europe for the United States, the Refugee Adjustment Commitment helped them adjust to their new environment. They provided these new immigrants with financial support, a social worker, job placement assistance and other services from Associated Jewish Charities to ensure they would […]

1935

The Young Men’s & Young Women’s Hebrew Association became part of the Associated Jewish Charities. This youth-focused organization became a center of Jewish life for the community.

1935

With trouble looming in Germany, the Associated Jewish Charities and the Jewish Family and Children’s Bureau worked with The German Jewish Children’s Aid, a national organization that placed German Jewish children in U.S. homes. In the next five years, 35 immigrant children would be placed […]

1934

Local children attending the Jewish Educational Alliance Home Camp, held at the JEA building on Baltimore Street, enjoyed time on the playground on the roof of the building. 

1934

As the Depression rolled on, and families struggled to make ends meet, the Associated Jewish Charities, through its Jewish Social Service Bureau, provided food, shelter, medical care, work assistance and more to help Jewish Baltimoreans survive.

1931

Jewish Baltimore was in the throes of the Depression and the needs of the community continued to grow. The Associated Jewish Charities launched a campaign, “Justice Not Charity,” and raised $627,000 in one week in order to support those who were struggling.


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