AMEN Teens Rally to Help
Ukrainian Refugees in Ashkelon


AMEN teen volunteers help Ukrainian refugees

Since the outbreak of the war in Ukraine, some citizens have made the decision to remain in their communities while hundreds of thousands have fled in the hopes of seeking refuge, safety and support in neighboring countries.

Ashkelon, one of The Associated’s partner cities, has offered to help provide relief to the growing number of refugees. As of the end of February, Ashkelon has absorbed more than 400 new immigrants with approximately 250 staying at the Golden Tower hotel which serves as a temporary first refuge accommodation and was modified to meet the immediate needs of the olim (people who are making Aliyah – immigrate to Israel).

The Head of Absorption, Deputy Mayor Sophie Beilin, and the staff of the Absorption Department are making every effort to assist and facilitate the immigrants – accompanying them to various government institutions, finalizing their status, providing information and making city services accessible, according to one source.

Among the refugees living in the temporary quarters are many Ukrainian children who are unable to attend school at this time. Teens from the AMEN Youth Volunteer City Program have rallied to help the Ukrainian refugees, joining the JAFI collective campaign to help organize donations of clothes, toys and other needed supplies in addition to dedicating countless hours to volunteering with the children and families.

The AMEN Teen Volunteers project, funded in part by The Associated’s Baltimore-Ashkelon Partnership for more than a decade, develops volunteerism and leadership skills among teenagers and young adults in Israel and supports and coordinates over 7,300 teens volunteering in Ashkelon on a weekly basis. AMEN has become a model program in Israel to engage teens with hands-on service.

Teen volunteers have been arranging afternoon activities for the children, helping educators with Ulpan classes (immersive Hebrew language instruction) and mostly providing rest and relaxation to help them overcome any trauma they may be experiencing.

Once a week, Daniel Sela, a counselor at HaShomer HaTzair youth movement in Ashkelon, volunteers with her 10th-12th grade classes, many of them Russian-speaking.

“It is very satisfying to be able to take part in the wide range absorption operation,” says Sela. ”Meeting with the children provides us all with an opportunity to focus on helping others and worry less about the current security situation.”

A representative from the Deputy Mayor’s office says that they will continue to collect donations and assist the refugees – this is just the beginning.


Subscribe to our newsletter

The Associated is a home for everyone in the Baltimore Jewish community. We offer several email lists to help people find a community, engage with their peers and support Jewish journeys around the world.

Join Our Mailing List

Add Impact to Your Inbox

Sign up for our newsletter


Subscribe to our newsletter

The Associated is a home for everyone in the Baltimore Jewish community. We offer several email lists to help people find a community, engage with their peers and support Jewish journeys around the world.

Join Our Mailing List
Skip to content
This Website is committed to ensuring digital accessibility for people with disabilitiesWe are continually improving the user experience for everyone, and applying the relevant accessibility standards.
Conformance status